Restructuring the Bull City: Urban Form Change in Downtown Durham, North Carolina from 1914 to 2020

By Rahi Patel Intro The City of Durham is growing. Over the last decade, Durham’s population grew by 22%.[1] With the continued migration of technology firms, biotech startups, and other businesses to the Triangle, Durham is poised to continue its rapid growth for the foreseeable future. As cities like Durham continue growing, governments and citizens will have to contend with changes to the built environment. … Continue reading Restructuring the Bull City: Urban Form Change in Downtown Durham, North Carolina from 1914 to 2020

Master’s Project Abstracts: COVID-19 Case Studies

The research conducted by the Department of City and Regional Planning reflects the planning challenges of the moment, and this relevance is no better represented than through the graduated class of 2021’s Master’s Projects focused on COVID-19. Below are abstracts and corresponding links from selected Master’s Projects that span issues of transportation and housing in response to the global pandemic. For a complete list of … Continue reading Master’s Project Abstracts: COVID-19 Case Studies

Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

The Carolina Planning Journal was one of five publications recognized by the Center for Architecture’s 2021 Douglas Haskell Award for Student Journals. CPJ received an Honorable Mention for this year’s issue, Volume 46, The White Problem in Planning. An excerpt from 2020-21 Editor-in-Chief Will Curran-Groome’s Editor’s Note speaks to the variety of articles and book reviews featured in the issue: This past year has been … Continue reading Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

Assessing Extreme Weather and Climate Impacts on Public Health Practitioners

Last summer, Emily Gvino (MCRP and MPH 2021 alumna), teamed up with Dr. Ferdouz Cochran to conduct a needs assessment of public health practitioners across the southeastern United States to understand the impact of extreme weather and climate events in their work. With support from Carolina Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA), the duo surveyed 108 professionals from emergency management and disaster services, healthcare coalitions, hospital … Continue reading Assessing Extreme Weather and Climate Impacts on Public Health Practitioners

Reflecting on a Summer of Planning

This summer, Carolina Planning Master’s students participated in a range of in-person and remote opportunities across the country. This week, we are sharing highlights and reflections from eight students. Sam Stites – MCRP 2022, Economic Development Labor Organizing Fellow, NC Raise UP/Fight for $15 (Brevard, NC) Labor rights are central to promoting the sustainability, health, and well-being of our communities and the broader economy, yet … Continue reading Reflecting on a Summer of Planning

Master’s Project Abstracts: North Carolina Case Studies

Several Master’s Projects from the graduated class of 2021 underscored the impact the Department of City and Regional Planning can have in addressing equity, resilience, and accessibility across the North Carolinian planning landscape. A selection of abstracts and accompanying links to the full report are listed below. For a complete list of DCRP Master’s Projects see here, and for more information on the Master’s Project … Continue reading Master’s Project Abstracts: North Carolina Case Studies

A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)

By Mad Bankson & Duncan Dodson Introduction A 2019 Durham-based advertising campaign asserted that “Durham is the most diverse, proud and vibrant destination in North Carolina.”[i] For those outside the state, Durham is most well-known for housing Duke University and for its large research industry. However, the Bull City’s history is defined by the presence of vibrant Black communities like Hayti, Walltown, and Bragtown, Civil … Continue reading A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)

Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

By Eve Lettau When I tell people that the High Line is my least favorite park in New York City, their jaws instantly drop. I am aware that some view my opinion as blasphemous, but when we critically assess the High Line’s impact, it’s clear it wasn’t designed to benefit all New Yorkers. Please, don’t get me wrong, it has some very good qualities. It … Continue reading Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

History Repeats Itself: How to Help Southern Louisiana

By Pierce Holloway, CPJ Editor-In-Chief & Emma Vinella-Brusher, Angles Managing Editor On August 29th, Category 4 Hurricane Ida struck the state of Louisiana. Described by Governor John Bel Edwards as “the strongest storm to hit anywhere in the state since the 1850s,” the storm’s center passed within 18 miles of downtown New Orleans causing tremendous damage to the area.[i] Within hours over 560,000 households were … Continue reading History Repeats Itself: How to Help Southern Louisiana