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Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! The theme of Volume 44, Changing Ways, Making Change, was inspired by the planner’s enduring yet evolving relationship with change. Our field is inherently intertwined with change: how can we best adapt to and manage inevitable change, prevent detrimental change, and … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning

Radical: fundamental; extreme; favoring extreme changes in existing views, habits, conditions, or institutions; advocating extreme measures to retain or restore a political state of affairs. –Merriam-Webster Dictionary While I’ve been a strong advocate for change, I’ve honestly never really thought of myself, my work, or my beliefs as radical. I may protest wrongs or practice ‘do unto others as I would have them do unto … Continue reading A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning

DCRP Summer Musings

In a summer unlike any other, DCRP students continue to find ways to engage with their communities and have meaningful experiences. This week, we are sharing updates and reflections from four students. Emily Gvino This summer, Emily Gvino is completing her Gillings School of Global Health practicum requirements with the Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA), a sub-organization under NOAA as part of their Climate … Continue reading DCRP Summer Musings

Call for Papers: Carolina Planning Journal, Volume 46

Carolina Planning Journal (CPJ) is pleased to announce its call for papers for Volume 46 of the Journal, to be published May 2021. In response to recent events of police violence against Blacks and other people of color, as well as national Black Lives Matter activism, CPJ’s upcoming issue will focus on how race intersects with planning. Specifically, Volume 46 will focus on whiteness in … Continue reading Call for Papers: Carolina Planning Journal, Volume 46

From the Archives: Planning for 36 Hours in Wilmington, NC

This week’s post was originally published by Luke Lowry on October 24, 2019. About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!   About … Continue reading From the Archives: Planning for 36 Hours in Wilmington, NC

From the Archives: How to Engage your Community Online

This week’s post was originally published by Sarah Parkins on April 19, 2018. This year has seen the world scramble to switch much of its in-person activities to an online format. What does this mean for community engagement? In her piece, Sarah Perkins shares her master’s project work, which researched the best practices for utilizing online community engagement tools. It’s no secret that community engagement … Continue reading From the Archives: How to Engage your Community Online

Pandemic Musings: Consent and Corona

By: Amy Sechrist Reflecting on the pandemic response thus far, I’m struck by the shift in tone surrounding personal and community responsibility related to COVID-19. The initial lockdown and self-isolation periods felt more like a call to sacrifice for a larger public good. We were asked, even if we were healthy, to please stay home and avoid being the link in a transmission chain that … Continue reading Pandemic Musings: Consent and Corona

Black Lives Matter

We paused our normal programming last week as we all processed the events from around the country. CPJ leadership stands in solidarity with the Black community and commits to an anti-racism online space.  To do our part in pushing the conversation forward, we will incorporate more posts that address racial justice and regularly promote different educational resources. We would like to begin with a book recommendation. The … Continue reading Black Lives Matter

Rebuilding their trust in what we say: Public information’s new frontier

This piece was originally published by Patience Wall on the Coastal Resilience Blog on May 18, 2020 Public information is at the core of our public safety and natural disaster resilience work. It’s a reliable source we can turn to when outcomes are uncertain and emergency responses are ambiguous. But in a world where we’re constantly bombarded with growing misinformation, contentious mistrust of government and … Continue reading Rebuilding their trust in what we say: Public information’s new frontier

Conceptual Design of Olde Richmond, Philadelphia: Olde Richmond Waterfront District

By Jo Kwon and Mariah Wozniak Introduction The Delaware River has played a vital role in Philadelphia’s economic development since the City’s inception as goods were transported via the River’s piers, wharfs, and canals to faraway places (Philadelphia2035 2011, 4). Access to the River provided an avenue to establish trade routes and enable the manufacturing economies that propelled Philadelphia into manufacturing prominence. However, Philadelphia neighborhoods … Continue reading Conceptual Design of Olde Richmond, Philadelphia: Olde Richmond Waterfront District

CPJ Recommended Book: Soft City

Sim provides a vision of an alternative urban future, where density and diversity in urban form strengthen our relationships and create a flexible city that is both efficient and enjoyable to inhabit. Amy Sechrist, Soft City Book Review We are pleased to announce that David Sim’s Soft City has been selected as our “recommended book” from the 45th edition of the Carolina Planning Journal. While … Continue reading CPJ Recommended Book: Soft City