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Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

Carolina Planning Journal is accepting abstracts for papers relating to:PLANNING FOR HEALTHY CITIES “The power of community to create health is far greater than any physician, clinic, or hospital”– Dr. Mark Hyman, physician Planning has been deeply intertwined with the need for healthier urban populations from the very beginning, with early planners such as Ebenezer Howard and Frederick Law Olmsted attempting to balance public health … Continue reading Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

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Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! The theme of Volume 44, Changing Ways, Making Change, was inspired by the planner’s enduring yet evolving relationship with change. Our field is inherently intertwined with change: how can we best adapt to and manage inevitable change, prevent detrimental change, and … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

By Jo Kwon With the introduction of new technologies and the pandemic forcing many people to work from home, the media has increasingly used the term “smart cities.” There will be more smart cities worldwide in the coming years, from Toyota’s Woven City to Copenhagen Connecting. However, some have also been scrapped, like Google’s Sidewalk Toronto project, due to the economic uncertainty caused by COVID-19.[i] … Continue reading Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

North Carolina’s Tech Boom and Housing Affordability

By Elijah Gullett In light of Apple’s announcement that they will be placing one of their headquarters in Wake County, many fear skyrocketing housing costs in response. Apple touts that this new 3,000 new jobs to the area, potentially encouraging mass migration to the Raleigh-Durham area. Google has also recently announced their plans to build a hub in Durham and claims that they will eventually … Continue reading North Carolina’s Tech Boom and Housing Affordability

Introducing Our New Editors

The Carolina Planning Journal (CPJ) and ∆NGLES are excited to announce the editors for the 2021-2022 school year: Pierce Holloway and Emma Vinella-Brusher. Read on to learn more about them. PIERCE HOLLOWAY | Editor-in-Chief, Carolina Planning Journal Pierce Holloway is a second-year master’s student at the Department of City and Regional Planning with a focus on Climate Change Adaptation. Before coming to Chapel Hill he … Continue reading Introducing Our New Editors

The Chapel Hill Inventory of Resources for Bicycles (CHIRB)

By Eli Powell In May 2020, my supervisors on the Transportation Planning Team at the Town of Chapel Hill approached me about updating their bicycle parking inventory. It had not been touched since 2011 and the Planning Department wanted more current bicycle parking data in order to more thoroughly analyze how well developers were adhering to bicycle parking capacity requirements and design guidelines outlined in … Continue reading The Chapel Hill Inventory of Resources for Bicycles (CHIRB)

The Potential Impacts of Autonomous Vehicles on Future U.S. Land Use

By Will Anderson The following is written under the assumption that by the year 2050, the United States will have completely converted to the usage of level 5 autonomous vehicles (AVs). This means that all vehicles will be fully automated and capable of performing all driving functions under any conditions. Innovations such as camera sensors, Lidar, Radar, ultrasound, and computer vision will enable AVs to … Continue reading The Potential Impacts of Autonomous Vehicles on Future U.S. Land Use

How to Help Texans

Winter Storm Uri brought freezing temperatures to the state of Texas and power outages to millions. Now, several days later, nearly a half-million residents remain without electricity and struggle to stay warm and survive the harsh conditions. Many have pointed to how the blackouts have disproportionately affected already vulnerable populations, and night photos seem to highlight the physicality of the divide. Organizations across Texas are … Continue reading How to Help Texans