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Now Available Online – Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! The theme for this issue, “Planning for Uncertainty,” was inspired by the unexpected results of the 2016 presidential election, which raised countless questions about our values, how politics affect planning, and the future trajectory of our country. Authors in this … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

“We don’t need to sacrifice the quality of our scholarship to have an impact, to make a change.” That quote, from University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Planning, Dr. Marccus Hendricks, sums up the take-home message from this year’s Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop: change isn’t easy, but it’s possible, and it’s up to us as researchers to help make it happen. The Hazards … Continue reading Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

For much of its history, Siler City, North Carolina was mostly white; now, due to jobs in poultry processing, the town is 40% Latinx. Driving through downtown, the demographic change is marked by the tiendas, beauty salons, and evangelical churches with signs en español that line the streets. Like many towns across the state, Siler City suffered when the furniture and textile industries moved elsewhere. … Continue reading How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Asheville, NC

Planner’s Travel Series  About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!    About the visit: Asheville’s award-winning breweries, food, art, and trails are … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Asheville, NC

Phil Freelon, Durham Architect and Architect of Record for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Dead at 66

Philip Goodwin Freelon, local architect and the Architect of Record for the lauded National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., died on July 9th, 2019, at the age of 66. His death was due to complications from ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. In addition to being a nationally prominent architect, Mr. Freelon was an important local … Continue reading Phil Freelon, Durham Architect and Architect of Record for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Dead at 66

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Los Angeles, CA

Planner’s Travel Series About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series of blog posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact! About the visit: Los Angeles cannot be tackled in 36 hours! I’ve … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Los Angeles, CA

Master’s Project Abstracts: Planning Tools and Equity

The Department of City and Regional Planning’s graduating class of 2019 completed their Master’s Projects on a vast array of topics, all demonstrating independent, original work on students’ areas of interest. This series shares the abstracts of projects that focus on similar topics. Here, we look at planning tools and equity covering areas ranging from temporary urbanism to natural hazard mitigation.   Formalization of Temporary … Continue reading Master’s Project Abstracts: Planning Tools and Equity

Why Planners Should Study Finance

In 2016, Oregon planners hoped to take advantage of a new light-rail line between Portland and Gresham, a suburban city towards the east, by developing a mixed-use community around Gresham’s rail station. The project would be a walkable transit-hub in a city otherwise dominated by single-family homes and automobiles. But Metro – Portland’s regional government that purchased the land – faced a problem. Nearly all … Continue reading Why Planners Should Study Finance