Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! “The prefix ‘re-‘ holds two contradictory connotations. It can mean ‘again,’ or multiple repetitions, or it can mean a withdrawal or reversal. While one meaning implies forward motion, the other suggests retreat. And what a provoking approach to take to … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable

During the drought in 2002, it became clear that UNC-Chapel Hill would need to improve water conservation efforts on campus. In addition to viewing water conservation as a good business practice and good for the environment, Carolina also began to think of it as a means to make the University more resilient to drought and supply disruptions. In 2009 the University invested in the construction … Continue reading Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable

Water resilience in the city

North Carolina has many water-related problems. To mention some: Droughts, pollution of streams and lakes, quantity and quality of drinking water. Additionally, the cities and communities in the state are particularly vulnerable to severe flooding, an increasing problem due to climate change effects. Severe rainstorms, limited run off capacity by streams and rivers, rising ocean levels, but also here and there missing links in urban … Continue reading Water resilience in the city

Transit Gets All the Flack When the Super Bowl Comes to Town

There are typical football games: large, crowded events with intoxicated tailgaters and truck advertisements galore. Then there is the Super Bowl: a high-security event attended by superstardom where the average ticket price runs in the thousands.1 This year’s Super Bowl, denoted by “LII”, is to be hosted in Minneapolis at the US Bank stadium on Sunday, February 4. It has also created logistical and publicity … Continue reading Transit Gets All the Flack When the Super Bowl Comes to Town

Using GIS to Visualize Displacement Risk in Durham

Every fall, groups of students in the Advanced GIS course at the University of North Carolina are tasked with creating a meaningful map using a variety of GIS-based tools acquired throughout the course. Inspired by recent city and county comprehensive plans and analyses, as well as rapid growth in nearby Durham, NC, one team of four UNC Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) master’s … Continue reading Using GIS to Visualize Displacement Risk in Durham

Piecing the Fragments Together: Approaches to Green Infrastructure Implementation In Cities

Using design and engineering, there are many ways that buildings, plantings, or other structures can absorb stormwater runoff, reduce the urban heat island effect, and improve air and water quality in a city. These practices are called green infrastructure (GI). GI can help cities save money and improve environmental quality for ecosystems and humans. Stormwater runoff, particularly in combined sewer system cities where runoff and … Continue reading Piecing the Fragments Together: Approaches to Green Infrastructure Implementation In Cities

Revisiting the Right to Housing

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently made headlines by declaring that “housing rights are human rights.” His statement came on the heels of the Liberal government’s unveiling of Canada’s National Housing Strategy, notable in its embrace of a rights-based approach to housing. Prior to last week’s announcement, Canada was the only major industrialized nation in the world to lack a nationally coordinated housing strategy.1 Canada’s … Continue reading Revisiting the Right to Housing