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Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! The theme of Volume 44, Changing Ways, Making Change, was inspired by the planner’s enduring yet evolving relationship with change. Our field is inherently intertwined with change: how can we best adapt to and manage inevitable change, prevent detrimental change, and … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 45 of the Carolina Planning Journal: Hazards in the Southeastern United States

Volume 45 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available to read online. Learn more about it below! Volume 45 of the Carolina Planning Journal, titled Hazards in the Southeastern United States, considers how planners can prepare for natural disasters in the near and distant future. The topic is timely given the significant impacts and costs of recent natural hazard events in our backyard following Hurricanes … Continue reading Volume 45 of the Carolina Planning Journal: Hazards in the Southeastern United States

36 Hours in Elysium

By Jacob Becker “There is no city in the world with more contrasts than Revachol.” That’s what they say, but I didn’t read the guidebook, so my knowledge of the region is basically non-existent. I’m in Revachol for an indeterminate amount of time, and I have to rely on what the city reveals to me as I shiver in the cold Insulindian winds. I hear … Continue reading 36 Hours in Elysium

Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

By Pierce Holloway Between 1935 and 1940, more than 200 cities in the United States were given Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “residential security” maps, which are more commonly known as “redlining” maps.   Redlining was the practice of designating neighborhoods in each city by one of four grades, which reflected the “mortgage security” of  local borrowers. Neighborhoods receiving “A” were colored green on the maps … Continue reading Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

Planning for 36 Hours in Tokyo, Japan

About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, Brews, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!   By Siobhan Nelson As the days grow darker and temperatures colder, I dream about summers … Continue reading Planning for 36 Hours in Tokyo, Japan

Planning for 36 Hours in Budapest

By Pierce Holloway About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Views, Dessert, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!   About the visit: While traveling in Europe In late 2017 I happened … Continue reading Planning for 36 Hours in Budapest

From the Archives: Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?

This week’s post was originally published on February 20, 2020. By Lizzie Tong In the realm of sustainability and urban planning, Singapore is often hailed as a city-state worthy of envy and comparison – a Garden City. Through 40 years of rapid economic development and a transformation into an international financial hub, Singapore has been mindful to protect its natural environment, developing a reputation as … Continue reading From the Archives: Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?

Housing & The Nuclear Family

By: Elijah Gullett Introduction Despite its noble origins, zoning in the United States has often acted as a means of exclusion. Instead of implementing regulations to protect the health and safety of community members, zoning has been used by local homeowners and NIMBY groups to enforce a particular vision of who belongs in society. This has taken form, and continues to appear to this day, … Continue reading Housing & The Nuclear Family

Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City by Brandi Thompson Summers

By: Veronica Brown Brandi Thompson Summers’s Black in Place: The spatial aesthetics of race in a post-chocolate city draws upon participant observation, interviews, media accounts, and visual analysis to present a detailed case study of the Washington D.C. neighborhood of H Street NE, a commercial corridor patronized by Black locals throughout the twentieth century that has undergone significant gentrification in the past two decades. Thompson … Continue reading Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City by Brandi Thompson Summers

Planning as a Front Row Political Issue

By: Evan King The people who benefit most from the American urban environment’s injustices do not usually make a habit of talking about them. Wealthy suburbs are built not just to keep resources away from minorities, but to make this deprivation invisible and undiscussed. It’s no coincidence that high-profile political debate rarely focuses on the built environment – national elections hinge on the support of … Continue reading Planning as a Front Row Political Issue

Book Review from the Journal: Superpower, Russell Gold

This week, we are featuring a book review from Volume 45 of the Carolina Planning Journal. Olivia Corriere reflects on Russell Gold’s Superpower. Superpower tells the story of Michael Skelly and his rise as one of the leading figures in the world of renewable energy. Book Review by Olivia Corriere Superpower follows quirky, optimistic businessman Michael Skelly from his beginnings installing rainforest canopy gondolas in … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Superpower, Russell Gold