Southeast & Caribbean Disaster Resilience Partnership

By Josephine Justin This past May, I started working with the Southeast and Caribbean Disaster Resilience Partnership (SCDRP) as a Program Coordinator. The SCDRP is a coalition of public and private organizations that collectively seeks to strengthen the resilience of communities to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of natural hazards and climate change. SCDRP is the broadest regional collaborative network for professionals in emergency … Continue reading Southeast & Caribbean Disaster Resilience Partnership

What are the Urbanists Listening to?

By Emma Vinella-Brusher Looking for some podcasts to listen to while walking to class, doing chores, or avoiding homework? Check out some of our favorite urbanist (or urbanist-adjacent) podcasts and featured episodes below. And if you’re looking for, even more, our September 2020 post includes a few more recommendations. 99% Invisible323- The House that Came in the Mail AgainDesign is everywhere in our lives, perhaps … Continue reading What are the Urbanists Listening to?

From the Archives: Saving Patients but Harming the Planet? Hospitals as Stewards of the Trash Crisis

This post was originally published on December 3, 2019. As we enter year three of the COVID-19 pandemic, we reflect on another global consequence – mountains of waste. A July 2021 study by MIT found that the pandemic alone has generated 7,200 tons of medical waste every day, largely disposable masks. By Emily Gvino, MCRP/MPH ’21 According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans produce 25% … Continue reading From the Archives: Saving Patients but Harming the Planet? Hospitals as Stewards of the Trash Crisis

Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

By Eve Lettau When I tell people that the High Line is my least favorite park in New York City, their jaws instantly drop. I am aware that some view my opinion as blasphemous, but when we critically assess the High Line’s impact, it’s clear it wasn’t designed to benefit all New Yorkers. Please, don’t get me wrong, it has some very good qualities. It … Continue reading Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

A Call to End Parking Minimums in Carrboro for a More Equitable, Sustainable, and Economically Vibrant Future

By Will Curran-Groome With the Town of Carrboro’s first-ever comprehensive planning effort currently under way, our community has a unique opportunity to assess where we’re at and chart a better vision for the future. This is a call for Carrboro’s Town Council to abolish parking minimums in Carrboro, which will help to move our town toward a more racially and economically equitable, sustainable, and economically … Continue reading A Call to End Parking Minimums in Carrboro for a More Equitable, Sustainable, and Economically Vibrant Future

From the Archives: Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?

This week’s post was originally published on February 20, 2020. By Lizzie Tong In the realm of sustainability and urban planning, Singapore is often hailed as a city-state worthy of envy and comparison – a Garden City. Through 40 years of rapid economic development and a transformation into an international financial hub, Singapore has been mindful to protect its natural environment, developing a reputation as … Continue reading From the Archives: Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?

Bears in the Sunbelt: An Overlooked Planning Issue?

When people consider the rapidly expanding suburban sprawl around cities like Atlanta and Raleigh, the typical thoughts are of traffic and lost countryside. People concerned about the environment rightly lament lost rural areas and increased emissions. One issue that I think people fail to consider in planning is how increased contact with nature can be immediately dangerous to people. In the piedmont south, farmland is … Continue reading Bears in the Sunbelt: An Overlooked Planning Issue?

From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

This week we’re sharing an article that originally appeared in Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal back in 2018. The theme of that edition was Planning for Uncertainty, which seems fitting in the midst of Presidential Election primary season! In this Volume, articles covered diverse topics from gentrification to education to explore the myriad ways in which risk and uncertainty are ever present in … Continue reading From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

DCRP Master’s Project Preview

UNC’s top-ranked master’s program is designed to successfully prepare students for professional planning practice. A central component of the curriculum is a final capstone project, an ‘MP,’ which provides an opportunity for students to apply the skills and knowledge they’ve developed in the classroom and demonstrate their readiness for practice. But the MP is also a space for students to engage with pressing social and … Continue reading DCRP Master’s Project Preview

Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?

By Lizzie Tong In the realm of sustainability and urban planning, Singapore is often hailed as a city-state worthy of envy and comparison – a Garden City. Through 40 years of rapid economic development and a transformation into an international financial hub, Singapore has been mindful to protect its natural environment, developing a reputation as a leader in green design. As a small island about … Continue reading Can America Replicate Singapore’s Garden Cities?