REPOST: What Exactly Is “Local Food”? Ten Answers for North Carolina and Beyond

We all need to eat. Each of us deserves access to affordable, healthy, and culturally appropriate nourishment. But food influences more than just individual health.The way in which food is grown (such as the use of pesticides, how animal waste is managed, and the type of crops grown) affect soil, air, and water quality, which in turn affect the health of the environment and people … Continue reading REPOST: What Exactly Is “Local Food”? Ten Answers for North Carolina and Beyond

Land Use Planning and the Contest for the Meaning of Nature

At the heart of land use planning, an unspoken battle has been being waged over the very meaning of nature. And for most of its history, land use planners have unwittingly taken sides and acquiesced around a particular anthropocentric conception of nature that has determined the ways that land gets used. The continued consequences of climate change and ecological erosion, as well as economic inequality … Continue reading Land Use Planning and the Contest for the Meaning of Nature

Green and Open Space Increase Neighboring Property Values

What is the value of green space?  You probably know the answer to this question. If you said green space provides benefits to public health, you’re absolutely right. If you said green space improves drinking water quality, you’re right too. However, green space has monetary benefits as well. What is the value of green space to the homeowner that lives next door? That is a … Continue reading Green and Open Space Increase Neighboring Property Values

Lessons Learned from the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic’s First Annual Environmental Justice Symposium

The Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic recently held its first annual Environmental Justice Symposium, which took place on February 9th 2018 at the Duke University Law School. The theme of the symposium was access to water and sanitation in underserved communities and was an effort to bring to light some of the most prominent environmental justice issues afflicting underserved populations. The symposium included a … Continue reading Lessons Learned from the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic’s First Annual Environmental Justice Symposium

Grace Lake and the Sinkhole of 1986: A Remediation Plan and 30-year Saga of Grass Roots Involvement

Central Florida, encompassing the area between Daytona and Tampa, contains numerous lakes—and many sink holes, which occur due to the weakening and collapse of the supporting layer of limestone beneath the ground surface. In fact, it is understood that a majority of the lakes in this area (“sink hole alley”) were formed as sink holes appeared and filled with ground water from the large underlying … Continue reading Grace Lake and the Sinkhole of 1986: A Remediation Plan and 30-year Saga of Grass Roots Involvement

Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! “The prefix ‘re-‘ holds two contradictory connotations. It can mean ‘again,’ or multiple repetitions, or it can mean a withdrawal or reversal. While one meaning implies forward motion, the other suggests retreat. And what a provoking approach to take to … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable

During the drought in 2002, it became clear that UNC-Chapel Hill would need to improve water conservation efforts on campus. In addition to viewing water conservation as a good business practice and good for the environment, Carolina also began to think of it as a means to make the University more resilient to drought and supply disruptions. In 2009 the University invested in the construction … Continue reading Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable