Lessons in Disaster Response from the Tōhoku Earthquake and Tsunami

By Rachael Wolff Tsunami comes from the Japanese characters meaning harbor (津tsu) and wave (波nami). While earthquakes and their resulting tsunamis have been a part of Japanese life since at least the 13th century, the 2011 duo that rocked Japan was the largest ever recorded in the country and fourth largest in the world. Interviews with first responders reveal their challenges with mental health and … Continue reading Lessons in Disaster Response from the Tōhoku Earthquake and Tsunami

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in the Airport

I originally intended for this post to be a brief addition to our ongoing travel series here at Angles, sent from Granada, Spain—a perfect exercise in ancient, organic growth tucked away in the Sierra Nevada mountains, where the physical landscape of the city has been distinctly shaped by its unique cultural roots. I could have told you where to find a 3€ tinto de verano … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in the Airport

Bears in the Sunbelt: An Overlooked Planning Issue?

When people consider the rapidly expanding suburban sprawl around cities like Atlanta and Raleigh, the typical thoughts are of traffic and lost countryside. People concerned about the environment rightly lament lost rural areas and increased emissions. One issue that I think people fail to consider in planning is how increased contact with nature can be immediately dangerous to people. In the piedmont south, farmland is … Continue reading Bears in the Sunbelt: An Overlooked Planning Issue?

Master’s Project Research: Development of Curbside Management Strategy Typologies

by Tory Gibler As a resident of downtown Raleigh, I’ve seen an increased demand of curb access for delivery trucks, bike lanes, rideshare drop-off/pick-ups, and on-street parking. Riding my bicycle around downtown, it’s not uncommon to see a delivery truck using the bike lane as a loading zone, or see a rideshare drop off a passenger at a bus stop. Automobiles cruising for limited on-street … Continue reading Master’s Project Research: Development of Curbside Management Strategy Typologies

From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

This week we’re sharing an article that originally appeared in Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal back in 2018. The theme of that edition was Planning for Uncertainty, which seems fitting in the midst of Presidential Election primary season! In this Volume, articles covered diverse topics from gentrification to education to explore the myriad ways in which risk and uncertainty are ever present in … Continue reading From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

Sticky post

Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! The theme of Volume 44, Changing Ways, Making Change, was inspired by the planner’s enduring yet evolving relationship with change. Our field is inherently intertwined with change: how can we best adapt to and manage inevitable change, prevent detrimental change, and … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 44 of the Carolina Planning Journal

The Case for Public Space in Porthole Alley

By Luke Lowry Franklin Street is undeniably the heart of Chapel Hill. It is where students rush after sports victories, where people socialize over food and drink, and where alumni reminisce about their college years.  While UNC is many things to many different people, there is one area where it objectively falls short—providing adequate public space. However, a recent proposal by UNC to redevelop Porthole … Continue reading The Case for Public Space in Porthole Alley