Master’s Project Abstracts: North Carolina Case Studies

Several Master’s Projects from the graduated class of 2021 underscored the impact the Department of City and Regional Planning can have in addressing equity, resilience, and accessibility across the North Carolinian planning landscape. A selection of abstracts and accompanying links to the full report are listed below. For a complete list of DCRP Master’s Projects see here, and for more information on the Master’s Project … Continue reading Master’s Project Abstracts: North Carolina Case Studies

A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)

By Mad Bankson & Duncan Dodson Introduction A 2019 Durham-based advertising campaign asserted that “Durham is the most diverse, proud and vibrant destination in North Carolina.”[i] For those outside the state, Durham is most well-known for housing Duke University and for its large research industry. However, the Bull City’s history is defined by the presence of vibrant Black communities like Hayti, Walltown, and Bragtown, Civil … Continue reading A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)

Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

By Eve Lettau When I tell people that the High Line is my least favorite park in New York City, their jaws instantly drop. I am aware that some view my opinion as blasphemous, but when we critically assess the High Line’s impact, it’s clear it wasn’t designed to benefit all New Yorkers. Please, don’t get me wrong, it has some very good qualities. It … Continue reading Why I Loathe the High Line, and How Parks Became New York’s New Gentrification Tool

History Repeats Itself: How to Help Southern Louisiana

By Pierce Holloway, CPJ Editor-In-Chief & Emma Vinella-Brusher, Angles Managing Editor On August 29th, Category 4 Hurricane Ida struck the state of Louisiana. Described by Governor John Bel Edwards as “the strongest storm to hit anywhere in the state since the 1850s,” the storm’s center passed within 18 miles of downtown New Orleans causing tremendous damage to the area.[i] Within hours over 560,000 households were … Continue reading History Repeats Itself: How to Help Southern Louisiana

From the Archives: Advice from the Class of 2017

Back in 2016, the UNC City and Regional Planning’s Class of 2017 answered some of the incoming class’s deepest darkest questions as they began their first year of graduate school. As the Class of 2023 wraps up week 1 of the program, we revisit this great advice, still just as relevant a full five years later. By Rachel Wexler, Daniel Bullock, and Chris Bendix, MCRP … Continue reading From the Archives: Advice from the Class of 2017

REPOST: It’s a SNAP: Addressing Food Insecurity in the Face of COVID-19

This post was originally published on February 12, 2021. Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the largest single increase to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to date. Beginning October 1, SNAP benefits will permanently increase by 21%, or an average of $36.24 per person. This historic move by the Biden administration will help feed the more than 42 million Americans participating … Continue reading REPOST: It’s a SNAP: Addressing Food Insecurity in the Face of COVID-19

Trailer Park Urbanism

By Elijah Gullett Manufactured homes (also known as mobile homes or trailers) are a significant component of the housing stock in the United States. In North Carolina alone, mobile homes make up 12% of the housing stock.[i] Despite their prevalence, manufactured housing is plagued with stigmas. The derogatory term, “trailer trash”, is still a common phrase. These stigmas appear in state and local regulations as … Continue reading Trailer Park Urbanism

Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

By Jo Kwon With the introduction of new technologies and the pandemic forcing many people to work from home, the media has increasingly used the term “smart cities.” There will be more smart cities worldwide in the coming years, from Toyota’s Woven City to Copenhagen Connecting. However, some have also been scrapped, like Google’s Sidewalk Toronto project, due to the economic uncertainty caused by COVID-19.[i] … Continue reading Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

Sticky post

Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

Carolina Planning Journal is accepting abstracts for papers relating to:PLANNING FOR HEALTHY CITIES “The power of community to create health is far greater than any physician, clinic, or hospital”– Dr. Mark Hyman, physician Planning has been deeply intertwined with the need for healthier urban populations from the very beginning, with early planners such as Ebenezer Howard and Frederick Law Olmsted attempting to balance public health … Continue reading Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

The Fight to Save a Small-Town Bridge: Reflections on Infrastructure, Placemaking, and Community Engagement

By Ruby Brinkerhoff Sometimes an old bridge is just that. An old bridge. Nothing much to talk about, often beneath our feet and our wheels, but rarely the object of direct attention, let alone debate. Tucked away in the Delaware Valley, nestled between two sides of the Delaware River, the Milanville Bridge has connected New York and Pennsylvania since its original construction date in 1902. … Continue reading The Fight to Save a Small-Town Bridge: Reflections on Infrastructure, Placemaking, and Community Engagement