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Announcing the Carolina Angles Winter Photo Contest

Do you have winter travel plans? Preparing for a holiday staycation? Either way, Carolina Angles invites you to participate in our Winter Photo Contest! We encourage UNC planning students, alumni, and all urban enthusiasts to enter. Photos will be judged based on aesthetics as well the articulated connection to planning. The photographer of the winning photo will receive: Recognition in the Carolina Planning Journal and … Continue reading Announcing the Carolina Angles Winter Photo Contest

From the Archives: Essential Urbanist Documentaries from the National Film Board of Canada

This post was originally published on April 2, 2019. With winter break right around the corner, we wanted to share some recommended Canadian urbanist films to entertain you in the coming weeks. By Adam Hasan, B.A. Geography ’19 The National Film Board of Canada–NFB (Office National du Film du Canada–ONF) was established as the National Film Commission in 1939 during the third government of Prime … Continue reading From the Archives: Essential Urbanist Documentaries from the National Film Board of Canada

Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

By Elijah Gullett This memo provides a brief summary of the history and background of zoning laws, both federally and within the state of North Carolina, as well as the impacts of NC’s current exclusionary zoning status quo on housing affordability, economic opportunity and development, racial and class disparities, as well as its environmental consequences. This memo also addresses counter arguments raised by proponents of … Continue reading Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

Thoughts from Abroad: A Reflection on Week 1 of the UN Conference of Parties (COP) 26

By Pierce Holloway, CPJ Editor-in-Chief From November 1st to the 6th I had the immense privilege of attending the first week of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 26th Conference of Parties (COP) meeting in Glasgow, Scotland. My time at COP26 was ripe with captivating juxtapositions, intriguing talks, and harsh reminders of climate impacts. I am thankful to have attended the conference. … Continue reading Thoughts from Abroad: A Reflection on Week 1 of the UN Conference of Parties (COP) 26

New Website Highlights Communities’ Perspectives on Urban Renewal

By Lindsay Oluyede Between 1955 and 1966, U.S. cities reported displacing approximately a third of a million families for urban renewal projects. As noted by researchers at the University of Richmond, their homes were razed to clear land for redevelopment that included “new, sometimes public housing, more often private, or for other purposes like the development of department stores or office buildings.”[i] The displaced families … Continue reading New Website Highlights Communities’ Perspectives on Urban Renewal

Restructuring the Bull City: Urban Form Change in Downtown Durham, North Carolina from 1914 to 2020

By Rahi Patel Intro The City of Durham is growing. Over the last decade, Durham’s population grew by 22%.[1] With the continued migration of technology firms, biotech startups, and other businesses to the Triangle, Durham is poised to continue its rapid growth for the foreseeable future. As cities like Durham continue growing, governments and citizens will have to contend with changes to the built environment. … Continue reading Restructuring the Bull City: Urban Form Change in Downtown Durham, North Carolina from 1914 to 2020

Master’s Project Abstracts: COVID-19 Case Studies

The research conducted by the Department of City and Regional Planning reflects the planning challenges of the moment, and this relevance is no better represented than through the graduated class of 2021’s Master’s Projects focused on COVID-19. Below are abstracts and corresponding links from selected Master’s Projects that span issues of transportation and housing in response to the global pandemic. For a complete list of … Continue reading Master’s Project Abstracts: COVID-19 Case Studies

Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

The Carolina Planning Journal was one of five publications recognized by the Center for Architecture’s 2021 Douglas Haskell Award for Student Journals. CPJ received an Honorable Mention for this year’s issue, Volume 46, The White Problem in Planning. An excerpt from 2020-21 Editor-in-Chief Will Curran-Groome’s Editor’s Note speaks to the variety of articles and book reviews featured in the issue: This past year has been … Continue reading Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

Assessing Extreme Weather and Climate Impacts on Public Health Practitioners

Last summer, Emily Gvino (MCRP and MPH 2021 alumna), teamed up with Dr. Ferdouz Cochran to conduct a needs assessment of public health practitioners across the southeastern United States to understand the impact of extreme weather and climate events in their work. With support from Carolina Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA), the duo surveyed 108 professionals from emergency management and disaster services, healthcare coalitions, hospital … Continue reading Assessing Extreme Weather and Climate Impacts on Public Health Practitioners