A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning

Radical: fundamental; extreme; favoring extreme changes in existing views, habits, conditions, or institutions; advocating extreme measures to retain or restore a political state of affairs. –Merriam-Webster Dictionary While I’ve been a strong advocate for change, I’ve honestly never really thought of myself, my work, or my beliefs as radical. I may protest wrongs or practice ‘do unto others as I would have them do unto … Continue reading A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning

Black Lives Matter

We paused our normal programming last week as we all processed the events from around the country. CPJ leadership stands in solidarity with the Black community and commits to an anti-racism online space.  To do our part in pushing the conversation forward, we will incorporate more posts that address racial justice and regularly promote different educational resources. We would like to begin with a book recommendation. The … Continue reading Black Lives Matter

A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence

By Amy Sechrist Nuisance property ordinances are not a new concept, but their continued prevalence and persistence across the United States has many unintended consequences. So, what exactly is a nuisance ordinance? This short explainer will provide an overview of these challenging policies and what can be done to lessen their effects.  Nuisance property ordinances are part of a larger trend known as “third-party policing”, … Continue reading A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence

Undergrad Quincy Godwin: Using Facebook to forget affiliations, talk about climate change

Here’s the scene… I was taking a break from studying and scrolling through my Facebook feed during the Global Climate Strike week. It was depressing. All I saw were memes from both sides of the political fence, all on the topic of the ‘idiots’ on the other side. I feel that it’s worth saying that I strongly oppose the bipartisan political system in place in this … Continue reading Undergrad Quincy Godwin: Using Facebook to forget affiliations, talk about climate change

How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

For much of its history, Siler City, North Carolina was mostly white; now, due to jobs in poultry processing, the town is 40% Latinx. Driving through downtown, the demographic change is marked by the tiendas, beauty salons, and evangelical churches with signs en español that line the streets. Like many towns across the state, Siler City suffered when the furniture and textile industries moved elsewhere. … Continue reading How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

Lessons Learned from the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic’s First Annual Environmental Justice Symposium

The Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic recently held its first annual Environmental Justice Symposium, which took place on February 9th 2018 at the Duke University Law School. The theme of the symposium was access to water and sanitation in underserved communities and was an effort to bring to light some of the most prominent environmental justice issues afflicting underserved populations. The symposium included a … Continue reading Lessons Learned from the Duke Environmental Law & Policy Clinic’s First Annual Environmental Justice Symposium

A Prescription for Planning

Drive through any town in the United States and you will likely notice that landscapes change from stately brick houses and white picket fences to depressed shotgun houses and chain link fences.   What you won’t notice?   As you drive toward the city center and home values decrease, a skyrocketing increase in heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure is taking place. In fact, … Continue reading A Prescription for Planning

Charm City Grit: Change in Baltimore Starts with the Community

Baltimore is a city of contradictions. Within its boundaries, one can find self-avowed social justice warriors who are determined to undo centuries of injustice in the city. One can also find people who have never left the sanctuary of whiteness of the Inner Harbor. Continue reading Charm City Grit: Change in Baltimore Starts with the Community

Science Fiction and Planning

As planners, we often engage in visioning processes with communities to identify and elaborate on the kinds of communities we want to plan. Our vision plans build an image of what could be in order to inform the agenda, strategies and policies we then develop and implement as planners. Vision planning can be an imaginative space to respond to the needs and desires of a … Continue reading Science Fiction and Planning

Planners in Protest

Whether through attending protests, organizing community groups, or coordinating postcard-writing campaigns, the planning students of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Department of City and Regional Planning have refused to stay silent in response to the Trump administration’s attacks on immigrants, people of color, women, and the low-income. Jason Rece, who is an assistant professor of City and Regional Planning at the Ohio State University, wrote in a post … Continue reading Planners in Protest