Addressing Climate Change with the Federal Government: A Summer at Golden Gate National Recreation Area

My experience this summer was a bit different than that of most students finishing their first year of a doctoral program. Rather than sticking around to do research, I headed out West as part of a program designed to give students the opportunity to work on pressing climate change-related management challenges with the National Park Service (NPS). The Future Park Leaders of Emerging Change (FPL) … Continue reading Addressing Climate Change with the Federal Government: A Summer at Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Pittsburgh, PA

Planner’s Travel Series About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact! 36 hours is perfect for Pittsburgh. It allows for just enough time to get … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Pittsburgh, PA

Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

“We don’t need to sacrifice the quality of our scholarship to have an impact, to make a change.” That quote, from University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Planning, Dr. Marccus Hendricks, sums up the take-home message from this year’s Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop: change isn’t easy, but it’s possible, and it’s up to us as researchers to help make it happen. The Hazards … Continue reading Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

Interaction with Memory: Preserving the Past While Embracing Change

“The process of planning is very valuable, for forcing you to think hard about what you are doing, but the actual plan that results from it is probably useless.” – Marc Andreessen “Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past.” – 1984, George Orwell Cities not only represent the future but also have the responsibility to preserve their past. … Continue reading Interaction with Memory: Preserving the Past While Embracing Change

How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

For much of its history, Siler City, North Carolina was mostly white; now, due to jobs in poultry processing, the town is 40% Latinx. Driving through downtown, the demographic change is marked by the tiendas, beauty salons, and evangelical churches with signs en español that line the streets. Like many towns across the state, Siler City suffered when the furniture and textile industries moved elsewhere. … Continue reading How Immigrants Can Revitalize Rural Communities

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Asheville, NC

Planner’s Travel Series  About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!    About the visit: Asheville’s award-winning breweries, food, art, and trails are … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in Asheville, NC

Phil Freelon, Durham Architect and Architect of Record for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Dead at 66

Philip Goodwin Freelon, local architect and the Architect of Record for the lauded National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., died on July 9th, 2019, at the age of 66. His death was due to complications from ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. In addition to being a nationally prominent architect, Mr. Freelon was an important local … Continue reading Phil Freelon, Durham Architect and Architect of Record for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Dead at 66