Path to Peace: Road Building and Recovery in Afghanistan

While Americans are debating a Hyperloop, electric scooters, and ride-hailing services, some people are still just trying to access basic road infrastructure. Take Kunar, Afghanistan: located on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, Kunar is a stronghold for the Taliban and the Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP), the Afghan branch of ISIS. Despite the ongoing violence in Kunar, the government has been unable to advance its counter-terrorism agenda … Continue reading Path to Peace: Road Building and Recovery in Afghanistan

An Application of the Land Suitability Analysis Technique

The Work of Masters As part of the Master’s Program in the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC, Chapel Hill, each student pursuing a Masters of City and Regional Planning Degree must produce a Master’s Project in their final year. This often involves original research, work with community stakeholders, and advanced quantitative or qualitative techniques. The intention is to “demonstrate the student’s capabilities … Continue reading An Application of the Land Suitability Analysis Technique

Series: Planning for 36 Hours in New York, New York

Planner’s Travel Series About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact! About the visit: In my previous life, I was an architect. … Continue reading Series: Planning for 36 Hours in New York, New York

Equity and Adaptation in a Changing Climate: The UNC Climate Change Resilience Symposium

“If you had a town of 50,000 burned to the ground and hundreds of people killed by terrorists, do you think we would have done something about it by now?” It’s a provocative question, one of many raised at last month’s Climate Resilience Symposium. The person asking the question was Brigadier General Stephen A. Cheney of the US Marine Corps, and, perhaps surprisingly, he was … Continue reading Equity and Adaptation in a Changing Climate: The UNC Climate Change Resilience Symposium

DCRP Students Work on Interdisciplinary Research at the Nexus of Climate Change and Health

Two DCRP students, Emily Paul and Leah Campbell, are working on a group project examining stunting in children under the age of 5 in Peru, a project at the nexus of climate change and health. Continue reading DCRP Students Work on Interdisciplinary Research at the Nexus of Climate Change and Health

The Future of Biking Across the United States

If you have ever felt compelled to confront the importance of planning in your daily life, try biking on the rumble strip of a highway. The discomfort of being distinctly out of place reveals underlying structures in the way things are built. In the summer of 2015, I biked across the country 4,295 miles from Portland, M.E., to Seattle, W.A., with the organization Bike the … Continue reading The Future of Biking Across the United States

Race, Memory, and Monuments

The struggle over race, memory, and monument currently roiling the University of North Carolina is not without precedent. In early 2001, amidst a raging national debate over the issue of slavery reparations, a full-page advertisement appeared in college newspapers across the country. Entitled “Ten Reasons Why Reparations for Slavery is a Bad Idea – and Racist Too,” the ad was written by David Horowitz, a … Continue reading Race, Memory, and Monuments