Hurricane Michael

Making landfall yesterday with maximum sustained winds of 155 miles per hour (just 1 mph short of Category 5 status), Hurricane Michael broke the record for strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in the Florida Panhandle since records began in 1851. Striking near Mexico Beach, Florida, it’s minimum central pressure of 919 millibars also makes it the third most intense storm to make landfall in … Continue reading Hurricane Michael

Most at Risk for Erasure from Climate Change

Up and down the coast of the Carolinas, the iconic seaside towns are facing a brutal storm. Their residents, restauranteurs, and local government staff are holding their collective breath to see what will be left after Hurricane Florence. They know what we all know now—the storm’s waves and wind will likely bring large scale destruction. Local and national media are covering Florence by breathlessly reporting … Continue reading Most at Risk for Erasure from Climate Change

Update 9.13: Hurricane Florence Info and Resources

Key Points: (1) The anticipated track of the storm has shifted south. This is a better situation for the Triangle than we have seen predicted over the last few days, but we are still expecting extreme weather. North Carolina will still be subject to flooding, storm surges, and heavy winds. (2) The Triangle area is still at risk of flooding along rivers and ravines as … Continue reading Update 9.13: Hurricane Florence Info and Resources

Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! “The prefix ‘re-‘ holds two contradictory connotations. It can mean ‘again,’ or multiple repetitions, or it can mean a withdrawal or reversal. While one meaning implies forward motion, the other suggests retreat. And what a provoking approach to take to … Continue reading Now Available Online – Volume 42 of the Carolina Planning Journal

Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable

During the drought in 2002, it became clear that UNC-Chapel Hill would need to improve water conservation efforts on campus. In addition to viewing water conservation as a good business practice and good for the environment, Carolina also began to think of it as a means to make the University more resilient to drought and supply disruptions. In 2009 the University invested in the construction … Continue reading Stormwater and the Stadium: How Carolina Became More Resilient and Sustainable

Water resilience in the city

North Carolina has many water-related problems. To mention some: Droughts, pollution of streams and lakes, quantity and quality of drinking water. Additionally, the cities and communities in the state are particularly vulnerable to severe flooding, an increasing problem due to climate change effects. Severe rainstorms, limited run off capacity by streams and rivers, rising ocean levels, but also here and there missing links in urban … Continue reading Water resilience in the city

Zombie Preparedness: A Communication Strategy for Emergency Preparedness

Zombies have become a fixture in literary and cinematic culture over the past century. The list of on-screen zombie productions is extensive, ranging from White Zombie in 1932 and Night of the Living Dead in 1968, to this year’s Patient Z and dozens of others in between. In 2016, Netflix boasted a buffet of 19 zombie-themed shows to satiate their viewers’ appetite for the undead. … Continue reading Zombie Preparedness: A Communication Strategy for Emergency Preparedness