Hey UNC Planning Community, What’s Off about New East?

The first time I walked into New East, I was overwhelmed by the sensation that something was off. This happens to me from time to time, usually when I am in an unfamiliar space or a familiar space that has changed. This is not normally a hair-raising feeling, but it can become bothersome – particularly if the usual suspects have been eliminated and the impression persists.[1] … Continue reading Hey UNC Planning Community, What’s Off about New East?

Street Seats: a student-designed parklet in NYC

On the corner of New York City’s 13th Street and 5th Avenue, hundreds of people use the sidewalk adjacent to The New School University Center every day. For a university in Manhattan, “campus” is a loose term that defines the parts of the city traversed by its students. Union Square Park—a magnet of public life—is a proximate and popular space for students and faculty to relax outside, … Continue reading Street Seats: a student-designed parklet in NYC

The World Trade center Transportation Hub: Worthwhile or Wasteful

Some are questioning whether the exuberant lower Manhattan Transportation Hub was a good investment. The first iteration of the new World Trade Center Transportation Hub opened in early March, 2016. The new transportation hub forms the main transit access point for the new WTC complex, which includes 1 World Trade Center, several other high-rise office buildings, and the September 11th memorial, flanked by reflecting pools … Continue reading The World Trade center Transportation Hub: Worthwhile or Wasteful

Seven Creative Placemaking Resources

It’s that time of year again: the Carolina Planning Journal is being copyedited and proofread and then copyedited and proofread again. And it is looking very beautiful. So: we’ve compiled a list of seven creative placemaking resources in order to get all of you excited about this upcoming volume, “Just Creativity: Perspectives on Inclusive Placemaking.” ArtPlace’s Blog Series called “The Huddle” ArtPlace is a funder … Continue reading Seven Creative Placemaking Resources

Say No to Style: Community Oriented Architecture

Consider Roman arches. Arches were used in the Roman Empire because the form allowed structures to pass weight from above to below using fewer materials. The arch was so efficient that it spread throughout the Empire and became a defining characteristic of the Imperial style. Its use was, as a result, a reflection of the empire’s technical prowess and cultural values. In contrast, medieval Romanesque architecture … Continue reading Say No to Style: Community Oriented Architecture