Flipping the Script: Understanding Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety in Chapel Hill-Carrboro

By Emma Vinella-Brusher, Angles Managing Editor Each year, over 3,000 pedestrians and 850 bicyclists are hit by vehicles here in North Carolina, making our state one of the least safe states for walking and biking[i]. Last month, the UNC Department of City & Regional Planning and Collaborative Sciences Center for Road Safety were joined by Tom Flood of Rovélo Creative and Arleigh Greenwald aka Bike … Continue reading Flipping the Script: Understanding Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety in Chapel Hill-Carrboro

New York City Congestion Pricing is Needed – But Only if Equity Concerns are Taken Seriously

By Sophia Nelson If the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) approves the Central Business District Program’s Environmental Assessment, New York City will be the first in the nation to implement a congestion pricing program, something it desperately needs to minimize congestion in Manhattan and to raise revenue for overdue transit improvements, but it must help make transportation easier for those it aims to serve – not … Continue reading New York City Congestion Pricing is Needed – But Only if Equity Concerns are Taken Seriously

On the Road to Transportation Leadership in Blacksburg, VA

Earlier this semester, a group of seven UNC Transportation Planning students made the trek up to Blacksburg, Virginia for the 2022 Southern District Institute of Transportation Engineers (SDITE) Student Leadership Summit. Jointly hosted by Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia, the conference brought together students from 24 universities for a weekend of presentations and networking. Under the theme “Invent the Future: Developing the Next … Continue reading On the Road to Transportation Leadership in Blacksburg, VA

Seems Like an Unsolvable Problem: A Loosely Hinged Recommendation for Tackling Bus Driver Shortages

By James Hamilton This week Chapel Hill Transit celebrated Valentine’s Day by restoring several bus trips that had been removed at the beginning of the year.[i]  Following an erratic Fall semester, the provider officially reduced its service in response to staff shortages. Beginning in January 2022, the A, CL, CM, CW, D, J, and N routes all had leaner schedules with the goal of “minimizing … Continue reading Seems Like an Unsolvable Problem: A Loosely Hinged Recommendation for Tackling Bus Driver Shortages

Missing the Train: Why Raleigh’s Lack of a Light Rail is Holding the City Back

By Ian Ramirez If you’re a vehicle owner and you’re reading this, I’m willing to bet you can think of a time or two in your life where you felt a real freedom attached to driving. However, I’d also wager that you don’t always love sitting in traffic when you’re already twenty minutes late to work. Recognizing the environmental and economic downturn that has been … Continue reading Missing the Train: Why Raleigh’s Lack of a Light Rail is Holding the City Back

The Fight to Save a Small-Town Bridge: Reflections on Infrastructure, Placemaking, and Community Engagement

By Ruby Brinkerhoff Sometimes an old bridge is just that. An old bridge. Nothing much to talk about, often beneath our feet and our wheels, but rarely the object of direct attention, let alone debate. Tucked away in the Delaware Valley, nestled between two sides of the Delaware River, the Milanville Bridge has connected New York and Pennsylvania since its original construction date in 1902. … Continue reading The Fight to Save a Small-Town Bridge: Reflections on Infrastructure, Placemaking, and Community Engagement

Lessons from the Fuel Shortage

By Pierce Holloway, Editor-in-Chief Introduction If you are a driver living in the Southeast, you likely felt the very real impacts of last month’s fuel shortage. The crisis began at 5:30 am on May 7th, when a ransom note from hackers was found on a Colonial Pipeline control room computer. This event halted 2.5 million barrels per day of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel shipments, … Continue reading Lessons from the Fuel Shortage

The Chapel Hill Inventory of Resources for Bicycles (CHIRB)

By Eli Powell In May 2020, my supervisors on the Transportation Planning Team at the Town of Chapel Hill approached me about updating their bicycle parking inventory. It had not been touched since 2011 and the Planning Department wanted more current bicycle parking data in order to more thoroughly analyze how well developers were adhering to bicycle parking capacity requirements and design guidelines outlined in … Continue reading The Chapel Hill Inventory of Resources for Bicycles (CHIRB)

When to Encourage a Monopoly: Uber and Lyft Are Killing Public Transit

By Evan King From an equity, economic, and common sense standpoint, the title of this post sounds terrible. Hear me out. Public transit is in trouble and has been for years. Transit ridership has been falling across the United States, and researchers have been coming closer and closer to attributing this to the rise of ride-hailing. Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) like Uber and Lyft fulfill … Continue reading When to Encourage a Monopoly: Uber and Lyft Are Killing Public Transit