Lessons in Disaster Response from the Tōhoku Earthquake and Tsunami

By Rachael Wolff Tsunami comes from the Japanese characters meaning harbor (津tsu) and wave (波nami). While earthquakes and their resulting tsunamis have been a part of Japanese life since at least the 13th century, the 2011 duo that rocked Japan was the largest ever recorded in the country and fourth largest in the world. Interviews with first responders reveal their challenges with mental health and … Continue reading Lessons in Disaster Response from the Tōhoku Earthquake and Tsunami

From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

This week we’re sharing an article that originally appeared in Volume 43 of the Carolina Planning Journal back in 2018. The theme of that edition was Planning for Uncertainty, which seems fitting in the midst of Presidential Election primary season! In this Volume, articles covered diverse topics from gentrification to education to explore the myriad ways in which risk and uncertainty are ever present in … Continue reading From the CPJ Archives: (Re)Shaping the Development Discussion – Connecting Elected Officials and Resilience Experts in Coastal Louisiana

Resilient Engineering in a Post-Harvey Houston: The SSPEED Annual Conference

Sitting in the comfortable conference room, enjoying a lovely 80 degree ‘cold front,’ one could easily forget that, just two weeks earlier, Houston had been hit with the fifth largest coastal storm ever to make landfall in the US. Though it hardly registered on national news, Tropical Storm Imelda brought record setting rain and flooding to large swaths of the city. Because Houston is one … Continue reading Resilient Engineering in a Post-Harvey Houston: The SSPEED Annual Conference

What to Do the Day Before the Day After Tomorrow: Climate Change Surivalism

What are ‘Preppers’? While some people are still buying million-dollar land on Miami Beach despite the fact that it will be underwater in 50 years, others are taking individual measures to prepare for a changing world. Preppers, also known as survivalists, believe that they are likely to face a major catastrophe and take preparing for such an emergency into their own hands.  These catastrophes vary … Continue reading What to Do the Day Before the Day After Tomorrow: Climate Change Surivalism

Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

“We don’t need to sacrifice the quality of our scholarship to have an impact, to make a change.” That quote, from University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Planning, Dr. Marccus Hendricks, sums up the take-home message from this year’s Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop: change isn’t easy, but it’s possible, and it’s up to us as researchers to help make it happen. The Hazards … Continue reading Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

This winter has certainly been a wild ride with the Midwest suffering from record setting cold and unprecedented flooding, Washington experiencing unparalleled amounts of snow, and an usually wet winter pulling much of California out of a years-long drought. No corner of the country was left untouched by some sort of extreme winter weather, even North Carolina, which experienced a record-setting snowstorm back in December. … Continue reading That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

Unity in Disasters: Schools, Planners, and Natural Hazards

It’s a disturbing cycle: schools with high poverty rates and limited resources have the lowest-performing students, receive less funding, then even lower outcomes, which causes fewer people to want to move there, decreasing the tax base upon which resources are determined, and further depleting scarce resources. Researchers, public officials, and leaders across disciplines are concerned with figuring out how to break the vicious relationship between … Continue reading Unity in Disasters: Schools, Planners, and Natural Hazards