What are the Urbanists Listening to?

By Emma Vinella-Brusher Looking for some podcasts to listen to while walking to class, doing chores, or avoiding homework? Check out some of our favorite urbanist (or urbanist-adjacent) podcasts and featured episodes below. And if you’re looking for, even more, our September 2020 post includes a few more recommendations. 99% Invisible323- The House that Came in the Mail AgainDesign is everywhere in our lives, perhaps … Continue reading What are the Urbanists Listening to?

Book Review from the Journal: Urban Legends, Peter L’Official

In anticipation of Volume 47 of the Carolina Planning Journal coming out next month, this week we are featuring another book review from Volume 46, The White Problem in Planning. Veronica Brown reflects on Peter L’Official’s Urban Legends: The South Bronx in Representation and Ruin. Book Review by Veronica Brown A few televised moments speak to their era so well that they surpass television history … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Urban Legends, Peter L’Official

Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

By Henry Read For the better part of a century in the United States, exclusion, restriction, and fastidiousness were core values within the accepted best practices around zoning and development. While national trends seem to slowly be reversing course toward less aggressive regulation of uses and limitations on density, the built, legal, and economic environment in communities across the country strongly reflect this history. Even … Continue reading Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

This week, we are featuring another book review from Volume 46 of the Carolina Planning Journal, The White Problem in Planning. Nora Louise Schwaller reflects on Conor Dougherty’s Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America. Book Review by Nora Louise Schwaller There is no state where an individual working a full-time minimum-wage job can afford a one-bedroom housing unit without paying in excess of 30% … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

By Elijah Gullett This memo provides a brief summary of the history and background of zoning laws, both federally and within the state of North Carolina, as well as the impacts of NC’s current exclusionary zoning status quo on housing affordability, economic opportunity and development, racial and class disparities, as well as its environmental consequences. This memo also addresses counter arguments raised by proponents of … Continue reading Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

Trailer Park Urbanism

By Elijah Gullett Manufactured homes (also known as mobile homes or trailers) are a significant component of the housing stock in the United States. In North Carolina alone, mobile homes make up 12% of the housing stock.[i] Despite their prevalence, manufactured housing is plagued with stigmas. The derogatory term, “trailer trash”, is still a common phrase. These stigmas appear in state and local regulations as … Continue reading Trailer Park Urbanism

Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

By Pierce Holloway Between 1935 and 1940, more than 200 cities in the United States were given Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “residential security” maps, which are more commonly known as “redlining” maps.   Redlining was the practice of designating neighborhoods in each city by one of four grades, which reflected the “mortgage security” of  local borrowers. Neighborhoods receiving “A” were colored green on the maps … Continue reading Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

Housing & The Nuclear Family

By: Elijah Gullett Introduction Despite its noble origins, zoning in the United States has often acted as a means of exclusion. Instead of implementing regulations to protect the health and safety of community members, zoning has been used by local homeowners and NIMBY groups to enforce a particular vision of who belongs in society. This has taken form, and continues to appear to this day, … Continue reading Housing & The Nuclear Family

Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

This week, we are sharing a book review that appeared in the most recent edition of the Carolina Planning Journal (Volume 45). Veronica Brown discusses author Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s 2019 book, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership. Book Review by Veronica Brown In Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor details … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor