YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

Trailer Park Urbanism

By Elijah Gullett Manufactured homes (also known as mobile homes or trailers) are a significant component of the housing stock in the United States. In North Carolina alone, mobile homes make up 12% of the housing stock.[i] Despite their prevalence, manufactured housing is plagued with stigmas. The derogatory term, “trailer trash”, is still a common phrase. These stigmas appear in state and local regulations as … Continue reading Trailer Park Urbanism

Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

By Pierce Holloway Between 1935 and 1940, more than 200 cities in the United States were given Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “residential security” maps, which are more commonly known as “redlining” maps.   Redlining was the practice of designating neighborhoods in each city by one of four grades, which reflected the “mortgage security” of  local borrowers. Neighborhoods receiving “A” were colored green on the maps … Continue reading Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

Housing & The Nuclear Family

By: Elijah Gullett Introduction Despite its noble origins, zoning in the United States has often acted as a means of exclusion. Instead of implementing regulations to protect the health and safety of community members, zoning has been used by local homeowners and NIMBY groups to enforce a particular vision of who belongs in society. This has taken form, and continues to appear to this day, … Continue reading Housing & The Nuclear Family

Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

This week, we are sharing a book review that appeared in the most recent edition of the Carolina Planning Journal (Volume 45). Veronica Brown discusses author Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s 2019 book, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership. Book Review by Veronica Brown In Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor details … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

From the Archives: How to Engage your Community Online

This week’s post was originally published by Sarah Parkins on April 19, 2018. This year has seen the world scramble to switch much of its in-person activities to an online format. What does this mean for community engagement? In her piece, Sarah Perkins shares her master’s project work, which researched the best practices for utilizing online community engagement tools. It’s no secret that community engagement … Continue reading From the Archives: How to Engage your Community Online

From the CPJ Archives: Creative Placemaking

This week, we’re sharing an article that originally appeared in Volume 41 of the Carolina Planning Journal back in 2016. The theme of that edition was Just Creativity. To kick it off, DCRP Professor Andrew Whittemore reviewed the literature on placemaking and explored where the arts and creativity intersect with planning. Volume 41 and other back issues of the Journal can be found on our … Continue reading From the CPJ Archives: Creative Placemaking

DCRP Master’s Project Preview

UNC’s top-ranked master’s program is designed to successfully prepare students for professional planning practice. A central component of the curriculum is a final capstone project, an ‘MP,’ which provides an opportunity for students to apply the skills and knowledge they’ve developed in the classroom and demonstrate their readiness for practice. But the MP is also a space for students to engage with pressing social and … Continue reading DCRP Master’s Project Preview

Is Affordable Housing Moving to the Suburbs?

By Frank Muraca Since its creation in 1986, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) has become the largest source of new affordable housing in the nation, supporting the development of nearly three million affordable units nationwide and over 100,000 units in North Carolina. Each year, the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency (NCHFA) ranks applications submitted by affordable housing developers to determine which projects will be … Continue reading Is Affordable Housing Moving to the Suburbs?

A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence

By Amy Sechrist Nuisance property ordinances are not a new concept, but their continued prevalence and persistence across the United States has many unintended consequences. So, what exactly is a nuisance ordinance? This short explainer will provide an overview of these challenging policies and what can be done to lessen their effects.  Nuisance property ordinances are part of a larger trend known as “third-party policing”, … Continue reading A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence