Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

By Jo Kwon With the introduction of new technologies and the pandemic forcing many people to work from home, the media has increasingly used the term “smart cities.” There will be more smart cities worldwide in the coming years, from Toyota’s Woven City to Copenhagen Connecting. However, some have also been scrapped, like Google’s Sidewalk Toronto project, due to the economic uncertainty caused by COVID-19.[i] … Continue reading Chapel Hill: the Next Smart Town?

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Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

Carolina Planning Journal is accepting abstracts for papers relating to:PLANNING FOR HEALTHY CITIES “The power of community to create health is far greater than any physician, clinic, or hospital”– Dr. Mark Hyman, physician Planning has been deeply intertwined with the need for healthier urban populations from the very beginning, with early planners such as Ebenezer Howard and Frederick Law Olmsted attempting to balance public health … Continue reading Call for Papers: CPJ Volume 47

North Carolina’s Tech Boom and Housing Affordability

By Elijah Gullett In light of Apple’s announcement that they will be placing one of their headquarters in Wake County, many fear skyrocketing housing costs in response. Apple touts that this new 3,000 new jobs to the area, potentially encouraging mass migration to the Raleigh-Durham area. Google has also recently announced their plans to build a hub in Durham and claims that they will eventually … Continue reading North Carolina’s Tech Boom and Housing Affordability

Subscriptions for CPJ Volume 46: The White Problem in Planning

Carolina Planning Journal (CPJ), the oldest student-run planning journal in the country, is excited to announce the imminent release of Volume 46: The White Problem in Planning. This issue features articles and book reviews from a wide range of planning students, practitioners, and scholars; see the editor’s note below for brief summaries of some of the topics covered. We would love to be able to send … Continue reading Subscriptions for CPJ Volume 46: The White Problem in Planning

How to Help Texans

Winter Storm Uri brought freezing temperatures to the state of Texas and power outages to millions. Now, several days later, nearly a half-million residents remain without electricity and struggle to stay warm and survive the harsh conditions. Many have pointed to how the blackouts have disproportionately affected already vulnerable populations, and night photos seem to highlight the physicality of the divide. Organizations across Texas are … Continue reading How to Help Texans

Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

By Pierce Holloway Between 1935 and 1940, more than 200 cities in the United States were given Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “residential security” maps, which are more commonly known as “redlining” maps.   Redlining was the practice of designating neighborhoods in each city by one of four grades, which reflected the “mortgage security” of  local borrowers. Neighborhoods receiving “A” were colored green on the maps … Continue reading Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

Housing & The Nuclear Family

By: Elijah Gullett Introduction Despite its noble origins, zoning in the United States has often acted as a means of exclusion. Instead of implementing regulations to protect the health and safety of community members, zoning has been used by local homeowners and NIMBY groups to enforce a particular vision of who belongs in society. This has taken form, and continues to appear to this day, … Continue reading Housing & The Nuclear Family

WEBINAR RECORDING – Whiteness and Urban Planning: A Conversation with Edward Goetz and Rashad Williams

UPDATE: Check out the webinar recording, available here! We’re grateful to Edward and Rashad for taking the time to talk with us, and to the many attendees for their thoughtful questions. We hope you’ll take a moment to watch the discussion, which touched on everything from concentrations of white wealth to equitable community participation in planning. Don’t forget: Carolina Planning Journal’s 2021 Call for Papers … Continue reading WEBINAR RECORDING – Whiteness and Urban Planning: A Conversation with Edward Goetz and Rashad Williams

A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning

Radical: fundamental; extreme; favoring extreme changes in existing views, habits, conditions, or institutions; advocating extreme measures to retain or restore a political state of affairs. –Merriam-Webster Dictionary While I’ve been a strong advocate for change, I’ve honestly never really thought of myself, my work, or my beliefs as radical. I may protest wrongs or practice ‘do unto others as I would have them do unto … Continue reading A Response on De-Radicalizing Planning