The Viability of the Longleaf Pine

“Here’s to the land of the long leaf pine, The summertime land where the sun doth shine, Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great, Here’s to “Down Home,” the Old North State!” -North Carolina State Toast             The longleaf pine is North Carolina’s state tree not only because it is a beautiful tree, but because it is a productive tree. Hundreds of years … Continue reading The Viability of the Longleaf Pine

Addressing Climate Change with the Federal Government: A Summer at Golden Gate National Recreation Area

My experience this summer was a bit different than that of most students finishing their first year of a doctoral program. Rather than sticking around to do research, I headed out West as part of a program designed to give students the opportunity to work on pressing climate change-related management challenges with the National Park Service (NPS). The Future Park Leaders of Emerging Change (FPL) … Continue reading Addressing Climate Change with the Federal Government: A Summer at Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

“We don’t need to sacrifice the quality of our scholarship to have an impact, to make a change.” That quote, from University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Planning, Dr. Marccus Hendricks, sums up the take-home message from this year’s Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop: change isn’t easy, but it’s possible, and it’s up to us as researchers to help make it happen. The Hazards … Continue reading Building a Culture of Preparedness at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop

Interaction with Memory: Preserving the Past While Embracing Change

“The process of planning is very valuable, for forcing you to think hard about what you are doing, but the actual plan that results from it is probably useless.” – Marc Andreessen “Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past.” – 1984, George Orwell Cities not only represent the future but also have the responsibility to preserve their past. … Continue reading Interaction with Memory: Preserving the Past While Embracing Change

One Month on the AT

This May, after wrapping up exams and coursework, I set off on an epic new adventure – a three-week solo backpacking trip on the Appalachian Trail (AT). I felt drawn to nature, to clean air and wildlife, to green trees, and to the Appalachian mountains that feel so much like home. As John Muir put it, “The mountains are calling, and I must go.” Appalachian … Continue reading One Month on the AT

An Application of the Land Suitability Analysis Technique

The Work of Masters As part of the Master’s Program in the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC, Chapel Hill, each student pursuing a Masters of City and Regional Planning Degree must produce a Master’s Project in their final year. This often involves original research, work with community stakeholders, and advanced quantitative or qualitative techniques. The intention is to “demonstrate the student’s capabilities … Continue reading An Application of the Land Suitability Analysis Technique

That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

This winter has certainly been a wild ride with the Midwest suffering from record setting cold and unprecedented flooding, Washington experiencing unparalleled amounts of snow, and an usually wet winter pulling much of California out of a years-long drought. No corner of the country was left untouched by some sort of extreme winter weather, even North Carolina, which experienced a record-setting snowstorm back in December. … Continue reading That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

The Impacts of Defining and Classifying Brownfields

 This piece was originally written by Ben Berolzheimer for Planning Methods (PLAN 720) in November 2018. What are brownfields and why should planners care about them? The United States EPA (1) defines a brownfield as “a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.” Brownfields are located in just about … Continue reading The Impacts of Defining and Classifying Brownfields

How Asheville’s The Collider Can Help Us Meet the Challenge of Climate Adaptation

Already today, climate change is harming companies’ bottom lines and business models; undermining community disaster planning and recovery; and threatening individual health and wellbeing. The IPCC warned this year in a report later echoed by the U.S. Federal Government in its Fourth National Climate Assessment that the effects of climate change stand to become more severe much sooner than we thought. The need for climate … Continue reading How Asheville’s The Collider Can Help Us Meet the Challenge of Climate Adaptation

Is the Ground or the Government Toxic?

This piece was originally written by Kelsey Peterson for Solving Urban Problems (PLAN 247) in October 2018. In a country built upon life, liberty, and property, we cannot let businesses handle their toxic waste irresponsibly. The government must amend current laws to require developers and corporations to inform residents within an established radius of affected land about the potential hazards that their leaked waste causes. … Continue reading Is the Ground or the Government Toxic?