DCRP Students Work on Interdisciplinary Research at the Nexus of Climate Change and Health

Two DCRP students, Emily Paul and Leah Campbell, are working on a group project examining stunting in children under the age of 5 in Peru, a project at the nexus of climate change and health. Continue reading DCRP Students Work on Interdisciplinary Research at the Nexus of Climate Change and Health

That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

This winter has certainly been a wild ride with the Midwest suffering from record setting cold and unprecedented flooding, Washington experiencing unparalleled amounts of snow, and an usually wet winter pulling much of California out of a years-long drought. No corner of the country was left untouched by some sort of extreme winter weather, even North Carolina, which experienced a record-setting snowstorm back in December. … Continue reading That’s Not How Climate Works! Extreme Weather and Climate Misinformation

Is the Ground or the Government Toxic?

This piece was originally written by Kelsey Peterson for Solving Urban Problems (PLAN 247) in October 2018. In a country built upon life, liberty, and property, we cannot let businesses handle their toxic waste irresponsibly. The government must amend current laws to require developers and corporations to inform residents within an established radius of affected land about the potential hazards that their leaked waste causes. … Continue reading Is the Ground or the Government Toxic?

Unity in Disasters: Schools, Planners, and Natural Hazards

It’s a disturbing cycle: schools with high poverty rates and limited resources have the lowest-performing students, receive less funding, then even lower outcomes, which causes fewer people to want to move there, decreasing the tax base upon which resources are determined, and further depleting scarce resources. Researchers, public officials, and leaders across disciplines are concerned with figuring out how to break the vicious relationship between … Continue reading Unity in Disasters: Schools, Planners, and Natural Hazards

What You Need to Know About the California Camp Fire

The Camp Fire, named after Camp Creek Road near where it originated, has been burning since November 8, 2018. It is the worst wildfire in California’s history; this is not simply a state tragedy, but a national one. Furthermore, it is one that speaks to the unmeasured cost of climate change, which includes damage to environmental resources, expenditure of emergency resources, loss of built capital, … Continue reading What You Need to Know About the California Camp Fire

Post-Florence: Where do we go from here?

Robert Simmons, pictured above, was a New Bern resident who lost most of his belongings in the storm. He is seen here evacuating with his kitten named Survivor, leaving his father who chose to stay behind. Robert is one of many New Bern residents whose lives were devastated by Hurricane Florence, which was responsible for more than $100 million damages estimated by September 23rd.1 North … Continue reading Post-Florence: Where do we go from here?

Hazard Mitigation and Hurricane Harvey: Reflections on a Conversation with Dr. Galen Newman

The following is derived from an interview about the 2017 disaster with Dr. Galen Newman, a Fellow in the Institute for Sustainable Communities and a member of the Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center at Texas A&M University. His research focuses primarily on urban regeneration and flood resilience. Harvey was different. While many hurricanes pose serious flooding risks to coastal areas, the danger often lies in … Continue reading Hazard Mitigation and Hurricane Harvey: Reflections on a Conversation with Dr. Galen Newman