Book Review from the Journal: Urban Legends, Peter L’Official

In anticipation of Volume 47 of the Carolina Planning Journal coming out next month, this week we are featuring another book review from Volume 46, The White Problem in Planning. Veronica Brown reflects on Peter L’Official’s Urban Legends: The South Bronx in Representation and Ruin. Book Review by Veronica Brown A few televised moments speak to their era so well that they surpass television history … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Urban Legends, Peter L’Official

Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

By Henry Read For the better part of a century in the United States, exclusion, restriction, and fastidiousness were core values within the accepted best practices around zoning and development. While national trends seem to slowly be reversing course toward less aggressive regulation of uses and limitations on density, the built, legal, and economic environment in communities across the country strongly reflect this history. Even … Continue reading Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

This week, we are featuring another book review from Volume 46 of the Carolina Planning Journal, The White Problem in Planning. Nora Louise Schwaller reflects on Conor Dougherty’s Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America. Book Review by Nora Louise Schwaller There is no state where an individual working a full-time minimum-wage job can afford a one-bedroom housing unit without paying in excess of 30% … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

By Elijah Gullett This memo provides a brief summary of the history and background of zoning laws, both federally and within the state of North Carolina, as well as the impacts of NC’s current exclusionary zoning status quo on housing affordability, economic opportunity and development, racial and class disparities, as well as its environmental consequences. This memo also addresses counter arguments raised by proponents of … Continue reading Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

By Pierce Holloway Between 1935 and 1940, more than 200 cities in the United States were given Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “residential security” maps, which are more commonly known as “redlining” maps.   Redlining was the practice of designating neighborhoods in each city by one of four grades, which reflected the “mortgage security” of  local borrowers. Neighborhoods receiving “A” were colored green on the maps … Continue reading Marked by Grade: How Redlining in Miami Continues to Impact Home Values

Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

This week, we are sharing a book review that appeared in the most recent edition of the Carolina Planning Journal (Volume 45). Veronica Brown discusses author Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s 2019 book, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership. Book Review by Veronica Brown In Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor details … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Race for Profit, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence

By Amy Sechrist Nuisance property ordinances are not a new concept, but their continued prevalence and persistence across the United States has many unintended consequences. So, what exactly is a nuisance ordinance? This short explainer will provide an overview of these challenging policies and what can be done to lessen their effects.  Nuisance property ordinances are part of a larger trend known as “third-party policing”, … Continue reading A Primer on Nuisance Ordinances and Domestic Violence

The Path to Equity: Do Greenways Help or Harm Low-Income Communities?

It’s not easy being green . . .  unless you are a greenway. In that case, you’re probably a hot ticket for municipalities, especially those in North Carolina. As part of the East Coast Greenway, 372 miles of trails wind across the state. Get Going NC, a blog created by Cary-based author Joe Miller in cooperation with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North … Continue reading The Path to Equity: Do Greenways Help or Harm Low-Income Communities?

Planning, Design, and McMansions: A Conversation with Kate Wagner

Earlier this month, first-year Master of City and Regional Planning student Emily Gvino interviewed Kate Wagner, the creator of the viral blog McMansion Hell and whose work was recently included in the Web Cultures Web Archive through the Library of Congress. Kate’s writing focuses on architecture and design, and Emily was interested in hearing her thoughts on the state of housing today, new design trends, … Continue reading Planning, Design, and McMansions: A Conversation with Kate Wagner