New York City Congestion Pricing is Needed – But Only if Equity Concerns are Taken Seriously

By Sophia Nelson If the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) approves the Central Business District Program’s Environmental Assessment, New York City will be the first in the nation to implement a congestion pricing program, something it desperately needs to minimize congestion in Manhattan and to raise revenue for overdue transit improvements, but it must help make transportation easier for those it aims to serve – not … Continue reading New York City Congestion Pricing is Needed – But Only if Equity Concerns are Taken Seriously

The Impact of Structural Racism on Access to Healthy Foods

By Emma Vinella-Brusher, Angles Managing Editor Access to good, nutritious food is essential to our ability to survive and thrive as human beings, but this is not a right afforded to all Americans. Despite being a nation of abundance, the U.S. is plagued by food insecurity and poor diet, though these impacts are disproportionally felt by lower-income families and communities of color. For example, an … Continue reading The Impact of Structural Racism on Access to Healthy Foods

Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

By Henry Read For the better part of a century in the United States, exclusion, restriction, and fastidiousness were core values within the accepted best practices around zoning and development. While national trends seem to slowly be reversing course toward less aggressive regulation of uses and limitations on density, the built, legal, and economic environment in communities across the country strongly reflect this history. Even … Continue reading Facing Forward and Held Back: Mapping the Role of Zoning in a Progressive Small Town’s Housing Crisis

Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

This week, we are featuring another book review from Volume 46 of the Carolina Planning Journal, The White Problem in Planning. Nora Louise Schwaller reflects on Conor Dougherty’s Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America. Book Review by Nora Louise Schwaller There is no state where an individual working a full-time minimum-wage job can afford a one-bedroom housing unit without paying in excess of 30% … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Golden Gates, Conor Dougherty

Book Review from the Journal: Race After Technology, Ruha Benjamin

This week, we are featuring a book review from Volume 46 of the Carolina Planning Journal, The White Problem in Planning. Joungwon Kwon reflects on Ruha Benjamin’s Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code. Book Review by Joungwon Kwon Ruha Benjamin’s Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code offers past and current technology examples in our everyday life to … Continue reading Book Review from the Journal: Race After Technology, Ruha Benjamin

Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

By Elijah Gullett This memo provides a brief summary of the history and background of zoning laws, both federally and within the state of North Carolina, as well as the impacts of NC’s current exclusionary zoning status quo on housing affordability, economic opportunity and development, racial and class disparities, as well as its environmental consequences. This memo also addresses counter arguments raised by proponents of … Continue reading Exclusionary Zoning in North Carolina

New Website Highlights Communities’ Perspectives on Urban Renewal

By Lindsay Oluyede Between 1955 and 1966, U.S. cities reported displacing approximately a third of a million families for urban renewal projects. As noted by researchers at the University of Richmond, their homes were razed to clear land for redevelopment that included “new, sometimes public housing, more often private, or for other purposes like the development of department stores or office buildings.”[i] The displaced families … Continue reading New Website Highlights Communities’ Perspectives on Urban Renewal

Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

The Carolina Planning Journal was one of five publications recognized by the Center for Architecture’s 2021 Douglas Haskell Award for Student Journals. CPJ received an Honorable Mention for this year’s issue, Volume 46, The White Problem in Planning. An excerpt from 2020-21 Editor-in-Chief Will Curran-Groome’s Editor’s Note speaks to the variety of articles and book reviews featured in the issue: This past year has been … Continue reading Carolina Planning Journal Recognized by the 2021 Haskell Award

YIMBYism & Housing Justice

By Elijah Gullett In response to the post-2008 housing crisis, a pro-building, pro-development movement, often referred to as “Yes-In-My-Backyard” (YIMBYs), has grown significantly over the last few years. Self-titled YIMBY organizations (some more formal than others) have popped up across US cities to advocate for the abolition of “exclusionary” (single family) zoning, as well as other state and local regulations that slow the development process.[i] … Continue reading YIMBYism & Housing Justice

A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)

By Mad Bankson & Duncan Dodson Introduction A 2019 Durham-based advertising campaign asserted that “Durham is the most diverse, proud and vibrant destination in North Carolina.”[i] For those outside the state, Durham is most well-known for housing Duke University and for its large research industry. However, the Bull City’s history is defined by the presence of vibrant Black communities like Hayti, Walltown, and Bragtown, Civil … Continue reading A Queer People’s Atlas of Bull City: Exploring the History and Movement of Queer Bars in Durham, North Carolina (Part 1)