Now Available Online – Just Creativity: Planning for Inclusive Prosperity

Volume 41 of the Carolina Planning Journal is now available for free on the Carolina Planning Journal webpage. Just scroll to the bottom and click on the link! “Planning for creativity must focus not only on maximizing revenues or attracting capital, it must also address the way that the arts contribute to more equitable, livable, and inclusive cities for all.” Continue reading Now Available Online – Just Creativity: Planning for Inclusive Prosperity

Kisses Beyond the Gate: Putting up Walls in a Country that Values Intimacy

This post was originally published by Agora, the Urban Planning and Design Journal at the University of Michigan. It is reproduced here with permission.  Davor was the first one who kissed me. Let me explain. I recently spent the first month of my summer in Santiago, Chile, where I worked for an NGO called Ciudad Emergente. The organization does interventions and research surrounding public spaces … Continue reading Kisses Beyond the Gate: Putting up Walls in a Country that Values Intimacy

Better than Central Park: Gil Peñalosa’s vision for Raleigh’s Dorothea Dix Park

North Carolina’s Triangle is accustomed to global recognition for its research and institutions of higher learning. According to Gil Peñalosa, founder and chair of 880 Cities, it could soon become a paragon of park planning and design. Continue reading Better than Central Park: Gil Peñalosa’s vision for Raleigh’s Dorothea Dix Park

Incorporating Immigrants’ On-the-Ground Knowledge and Lived Experiences into the Planning Process

A special post from participatory practitioner James Rojas Immigrants bring new, innovative urban planning ideas to this country based on their prior lived experiences, yet these ideas are rarely heard in an urban planning meeting or incorporated into zoning and plans. Most immigrants don’t attend public meetings. Many are busy struggling and often live in the shadows of our communities. Many may be too humble, or … Continue reading Incorporating Immigrants’ On-the-Ground Knowledge and Lived Experiences into the Planning Process

Little Boxes on a Hillside: A Review of New Urbanism

As a design and development practice, New Urbanism (NU) emerged in response to widespread suburban sprawl across the United States. The movement seeks to create vibrant, healthy, and sustainable communities through human-scale urban design. NU’s fundamental tenants include walkability, connectivity, mixed uses, architectural diversity, green infrastructure, and increased density. But it’s rise in popularity since the 1980’s has not been without controversy. Critics of NU … Continue reading Little Boxes on a Hillside: A Review of New Urbanism