REPOST: American roads were built for bikes

Five o’clock rush hour is a concept that does not exist in car-centric cities such as Los Angeles. Because in these cities, traffic is a 24-hour nightmare. This car-dominated city, which is rumored to have more cars than people, leaves very little room to share the road with bicyclists. In an effort to accommodate more cars rather than more bikes, the city is lobbying to extend … Continue reading REPOST: American roads were built for bikes

Where Do I Park my Bike?

As cities and property owners continue to advocate for bicycling, where should we park our bikes? The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) produced a guide for planners to use when siting bike parking. An even more detailed guide is available from the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals. The Town of Chapel Hill has a remarkably fine-grained guidebook for what, where, and how … Continue reading Where Do I Park my Bike?

Envisioning an Active City: Lessons from Montréal

Oh, Canada. The United States’ neighbor to the North seems to have public services down to a science. On a recent trip to Montréal, Quebec, my suspicions of superior public amenities were confirmed as seen in the city’s compact urban design and nearly flawless transportation infrastructure. Montréal and other Canadian cities embrace the principles of smart growth with dense urban centers and transit-oriented development, and this … Continue reading Envisioning an Active City: Lessons from Montréal

American roads were built for bikes

Five o’clock rush hour is a concept that does not exist in car-centric cities such as Los Angeles. Because in these cities, traffic is a 24-hour nightmare. This car-dominated city, which is rumored to have more cars than people, leaves very little room to share the road with bicyclists. In an effort to accommodate more cars rather than more bikes, the city is lobbying to extend … Continue reading American roads were built for bikes

The Case for Safe Routes to School

This post originally appeared on the Safe Routes to School National Partnership Blog on October 21 2015. In advocating for Safe Routes to School programs in your area, you might face two major questions from school administrators, local planners, or political leaders: Will Safe Routes to School really increase students’ rates of walking and biking to school? Is Safe Routes to School worth the investment? … Continue reading The Case for Safe Routes to School