Hey UNC Planning Community, What’s Off about New East?

The first time I walked into New East, I was overwhelmed by the sensation that something was off. This happens to me from time to time, usually when I am in an unfamiliar space or a familiar space that has changed. This is not normally a hair-raising feeling, but it can become bothersome – particularly if the usual suspects have been eliminated and the impression persists.[1] … Continue reading Hey UNC Planning Community, What’s Off about New East?

A Planner’s Post Secret

The end of the school year–or end of anything, really–often brings reflection. Two years ago, when I was a prospective student of DCRP, the second-year student who picked from the airport confided in me during the thirty-minute ride their “planning secret shame”; the student did not personally want to live the life of urban density and was making plans to live on a ranch far, … Continue reading A Planner’s Post Secret

The Crystal Ball of King Tides: Predicting how cities will respond to climate change

Do you think that climate change will personally harm you? The Yale Program on Climate Communication recently asked this question of people across the United States. It turns out that where you live makes a difference. In some coastal communities, sea level rise has already started to creep into daily life, showing up a few times a year in astronomical high tides, or “king tides.” … Continue reading The Crystal Ball of King Tides: Predicting how cities will respond to climate change

NOAH: Everything You Need to Know

The first thing that may come to mind when you think of “affordable housing” is publicly subsidized housing operated by a housing authority or non-profit organization. What you may not think of, though, are the humble apartment complexes scattered across U.S. metropolitan areas which provide affordable rental housing to low and moderate income families without public subsidy. Referred to as “Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing” (NOAH) … Continue reading NOAH: Everything You Need to Know

Learning from Leaders: Food Systems and Community Voices in the Carolinas

Brownbag with Gini Knight and Jared Cates from Community Food Strategies As professionals working at the intersection of community development, land use, transportation, and economic development, planners are uniquely situated to help their communities address food systems issues. In fact, the American Planning Association recognizes food systems work as an opportunity for leadership in the field and the North Carolina chapter recently announced “food” as … Continue reading Learning from Leaders: Food Systems and Community Voices in the Carolinas

Where Do I Park my Bike?

As cities and property owners continue to advocate for bicycling, where should we park our bikes? The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) produced a guide for planners to use when siting bike parking. An even more detailed guide is available from the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals. The Town of Chapel Hill has a remarkably fine-grained guidebook for what, where, and how … Continue reading Where Do I Park my Bike?

Planners in Protest

Whether through attending protests, organizing community groups, or coordinating postcard-writing campaigns, the planning students of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Department of City and Regional Planning have refused to stay silent in response to the Trump administration’s attacks on immigrants, people of color, women, and the low-income. Jason Rece, who is an assistant professor of City and Regional Planning at the Ohio State University, wrote in a post … Continue reading Planners in Protest